Jupyter Releasing Some Nice Software

The Jupyter group have released an alpha version of a new Notebook environment called JupyterLab

JupyterLab is browser based, just like the old notebook system but adds a multiple pane environment. I’m not going to go into the details of the collaboration between the large number of organisations that have gone in to the development, go read the blog post announcing JupyterLab. Suffice to say that I’m glad such a high powered group are working on my favourite Python environment.

I installed the alpha (it’s quickly done with pip) and had a look. It’s an exciting looking development and will make a brilliant Python development environment.

At the moment it seems to be suffering from minor speed problems and minor layout problems in Safari (they are minor, don’t appear in Google Chrome and Safari is not currently listed as a supported browser so I’m not going to complain too loud.)

The built in editor can syntax colour Python. It even has colour themes for those, like me, who like a particular look in their editor. At the moment it is indenting only two characters with a tab (PEP 8 says it should be 4) and if you hit return with the cursor in column 1 then you get a first level indent on the next line.

These are the sort of problems you an expect in alpha software. I think I might install the current development version from Github and check there before filing a couple of bug reports. I’m a bit idiosyncratic, nothing I like more than spending an hour or two getting a bug down to it’s essentials and filing a report.

IPython 5

They have also released a new version of IPython they are calling IPython 5.0 LTS. It has some nice new features including syntax highlighting as you type and much better multi-line support. This is due to shifting from various command line interfaces to the purely Python readline replacement prompt_toolkit.

I think the move to prompt_toolkit is going to show major dividends as the library (currently at version 1.0.3) adds yet more functionality and that functionality moves into IPython. Jonathon Slenders, the author of the library, is also developing clones of Vim and tmux in pure Python using it and intends to fold features from those projects back in to prompt_toolkit.

They are designating this as “Long Term Support” as it will be the last IPython to run under Python 2. IPython 6 will require Python 3. Not is all lost though, they say they will continue to support Python 2 kernels with Jupyter Notebooks (and we assume the new Jupyter Lab). As they say in their announcement “For the 5.x series releases we are making an exception to that rule: until the end of 2017 the core team will do its best to provide fixes for critical bugs in the 5.x release series. Beyond that, we will deprioritise this work, but we will continue to accept pull requests from the community to fix bugs through 2018 and 2019, and make releases when necessary.” So it will be a while before us OS X users are forced to run Python 3 for IPython and break PyObjC and it’s brethren which are written in 2.7 (we can also hope that well before the 20202 deadline Apple moves to Python 3 and does the port of PyObjC.)

Easy Python Development

Taken together these two new releases improve Python development enormously for me. I have always been a fan of iterative development of my code in IPython and this just makes the explore and iterate method easier and easier.

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